Periodontics

Healthy Gums For A Healthy Mouth

A periodontist specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of periodontal disease, also known as gum disease. They are trained to perform a variety of procedures that can maintain and improve the health of the soft tissues in your mouth.

Bone Regeneration

When a tooth is lost, both bone and gum tissue compete for the vacant space. The gum tissue generates more quickly than bone, subsequently occupying the space. With a membrane placement we can keep the gum tissue from invading the space, which will ideally give the bone sufficient time to regenerate. Bone regeneration is often used to rebuild the supporting structures around the teeth, which have been destroyed by periodontal disease. Bone surgery may be used to attempt to rebuild or reshape bone. Grafts of the patient's bone or artificial bone may be used, as well as special membranes.

Ridge Regeneration

When a tooth is lost and not immediately replaced, the bone reacts to this event by 'shrinking back'. The bone becomes thinner from a width perspective and the bone height is frequently reduced. This process is known as bone resorption. In order to place implants, it is necessary to rebuild the bone width and height through regenerative surgical therapy. Bone grafting of the ridge is almost always required to enable accurate placement of dental implants. The grafting is completed utilizing tissue bank and/or synthetic bone particles combined with collagen membranes. It is a highly predictable procedure.

Socket Regeneration

When a tooth is extracted and an implant is to be placed (either simultaneously or in the future) it is always necessary to complete bone grafting within the residual sockets that are left behind after the roots of the tooth are removed. The shape of the tooth root is always different from the shape of a dental implant and hence there are always residual socket defects (holes) that must be filled in so that there can be excellent contact of the implant to the newly formed bone.

Laser Pocket Disinfection (LPD)

A Cleaner, Healthier Mouth
  • Kills bacteria and disrupts biofilm to reduce inflammation
  • No shots needed
  • Maintain healthy gums and avoid progression of gum disease
  • No antibiotics needed, avoids antibiotic resistance
  • The laser light can reach and destroy bacteria up to 6mm beyond the surface to help prevent bacteria from spreading back into the pocket
  • Safe for medically compromised patients, those on blood thinners, or those with diabetes

Frequently Asked Questions About LPD

How Will LPD Help Me?

By removing the inflammation, your body has the energy to heal naturally. The laser light kills bacteria and creates a clean environment for healing.

Am I A Candidate For LPD?

If you have gingivitis, LPD can help reverse symptoms. LPD can also be used to treat patients on a perio-maintenance program.

Does LPD Hurt?

Not at all! LPD is a quick and painless. If you are very sensitive, a topical anesthetic may be used.

Are There Any Side Effects?

There are no known side-effects of LPD in over 25 years of therapy, just bigger smiles. The treatment is safe for use around crowns, bridges, sealants, and implants.

I'm About To Have Surgery. Should I Have LPD?

LPD is beneficial to patients who have recently has surgery, or are scheduled to have surgery to reduce bacteria that may enter the bloodstream.

Why Do I Need To treat Gum Disease?

Gum disease has been linked to serious health concerns including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, pre-term birth, certain cancers & more.